ADHD: What Every Parent NEEDS to Know

Let’s start with a clarification. ADHD is a medical condition, not a personality flaw. Just as you need to be aware of, monitor, and support any other medical condition your child might have, the same is true of ADHD. Here’s why:

A child who isn’t paying attention, isn’t learning

Even if your younger child is managing now, you will find that as they progress in school and the workload gets greater, what was once manageable through some extra time on homework or parent support, is no longer sustainable. It’s like the old saying, “You don’t know what you don’t know.” Only in the case of a child who has ADHD, “You don’t know if you don’t know what you missed.”

Unidentified ADHD impacts social skills, particularly in girls

Ever hear the words “flighty” or “spacey” to describe a child? Chances are, she was a bright girl with ADHD who was overloaded. Imagine the impact on a child’s self-esteem when instead of supporting her when she needs help, we laugh it off to a character flaw. It might at least partially explain the under-diagnosis of girls with ADHD.

Consider the ADHD reality. Boys with ADHD are more likely to run around and play sports during recess. A recommended strategy to support ADHD. What about girls? They are far more likely to walk and talk, just the opposite of the type of mental health break a girl with ADHD probably needs. And when she misses part of the conversation, her friends get mad thinking: She doesn’t care, doesn’t listen, and never remembers what we tell her. As a result, if a girl doesn’t know how to cope with her attention needs, it could impact her friendships.

Unsupported ADHD can lead to risky behaviors

stop buttonKids with weaker attention tend to have more cognitive difficulty controlling their impulses. It’s not that they are any less aware of the consequences, but everyone, especially teens, contemplates taking risks. The problem is that kids with ADHD are more likely to take the risk. Let’s just say their “stop button” often doesn’t work as effectively without training. Unsupported ADHD is linked to behavior problems in school, eating disorders, dangerous and distracted driving, addiction, and earlier sexual activity.

What’s Next?

  1. Don’t assume your school will alert you. Remember, ADHD is a medical condition. So while asking the school to help you identify if your child shows signs of ADHD is a legal right, the teachers and support team at school might not recognize your child’s struggles.
  2. Don’t jump to conclusions. There probably isn’t a parent alive who hasn’t at one time or another wondered if their child has ADHD. Every child can show symptoms. Only a professional using an objective measurement tool is qualified to tell you if your child has ADHD. Don’t make assumptions, but do seek out expert help if you have concerns.
  3. Consult a professional. A psychologist, psychiatrist or pediatrician who specializes in ADHD is the best path to an accurate diagnosis and a comprehensive support plan. Of course, this is also expensive, and depending on where you live and the time of year, potentially a long wait.
  4. Use an Attention Screener. If you’re uncomfortable talking to the school and not yet ready for an outside professional, consider an objective screening tool to understand if your concerns are well-founded. Parent observation checklists are a good start. Child Mind Institute’s symptom checker and Understood.org’s Checklist of ADHD symptoms are two options. Ultimately, you will want an objective test. Mindprint’s free objective attention screening test is similar to the type used in some doctors’ offices.
  5. Begin supporting your child. Having difficulties with attention doesn’t equate to needing medicine. However, it does equate to having strategies to support time management, focus, and organization. Fortunately, most of the strategies for supporting students with ADHD will help all students. They are just a necessity for students with ADHD. ADDitude, Understood, and Mindprint all provide free strategies to support attention.

Guest Blog by:  Mindprint Learning

What Makes SSAT the Toughest Admissions Test?

SSAT logo2The admissions process for private schools is highly competitive, requiring strong grades, good SSAT scores and more. Take a look at the caliber of questions asked on the SSAT for grades 5-7, and you’ll see how tough the test can be. More than the SAT or ACT taken in high school for college admissions, the SSAT requires students to demonstrate excellent reasoning skills as well as solid foundational reading, verbal and math skills.

The SSAT, or Secondary School Admissions Test, is one of two national tests used for admission to private schools like Westminster, Holy Innocents’, Galloway, Marist and many others. Despite the similar name, there is no connection between SSAT and SAT. The SSAT Middle Level is for students currently in grades 5-7, and an Upper Level for grades 8-11. The test is designed to measure the verbal, quantitative, and reading skills that students have developed over time, both in and out of school. It emphasizes the critical thinking and problem-solving skills that are essential for academic success.

Below are examples of math and verbal questions on the SSAT Middle Level test for students in grades 5-7. See how well you can answer them! The correct answers are below. On the math section, students must do more thinking than calculating. In fact, calculators are not allowed for SSAT. The analogy questions in the verbal section require strong verbal reasoning skills in addition to vocabulary. Even straight-A students find the SSAT to be challenging. Plan to have your child take the SSAT two or three times.

qmath

qverb

Dogwood’s expert tutors work one-on-one with students to build key subject skills and deliver proven strategies for the best SSAT scores:

  • We identify each student’s needs, then customize each lesson to meet those individual needs.
  • We motivate students to strengthen their foundational math, reading, writing and vocabulary skills.
  • We provide effective strategies that students will use to answer difficult SSAT questions and manage testing time effectively.

All Dogwood tutors have a Master’s degree or above, as well as professional teaching experience. Their higher qualifications and teaching experience lead to more focused lessons, custom tailored for your student’s unique personality and learning style. With our help and guidance, students come to respect how their hard work will serve them well on the SSAT test and in school.

You may schedule SSAT Test Prep tutoring at the Dogwood learning center in Sandy Springs during the day or evening, including Saturdays and Sundays by appointment. Call 678-735-7555 to schedule a free SSAT practice test.

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Answers to math questions above: A, D, A.  Answers to analogies: C, D, B.  How did you score on this test for 5th, 6th and 7th graders?!

Optional SAT-ACT Essays – Take Them or Leave Them?

essay writerWhen your student takes the ACT or SAT, should it be with or without the optional essay? The ACT Writing section (essay) has always been optional. Not so coincidentally, students now have the same option when taking the SAT. The essays are the very last section of each test. Students who opt out of essay writing get to leave the test center, leaving the essay writers behind for another 40 minutes for ACT — or 50 minutes for SAT. The scores on the ACT and SAT essays are reported separately, not included in the composite scores.

The SAT essay is a pretty standard five-paragraph essay where students read a passage and analyze the author’s effectiveness. On the ACT, students read three different perspectives on a given topic, then evaluate at least one perspective, as well as explain their own position. The ACT prompts can be quirky, requiring a bit more preparation. In the end, good writers will have little problem other than the fatigue that sets in after three-plus hours of testing.

Which students should take the essay section of the ACT or SAT? If they are applying to colleges that require or recommend the essay, students should definitely comply. In addition, we recommend that all high-scoring juniors and seniors do the essay to demonstrate their writing skills, which are so important to success in college. Generally this includes students scoring 1350+ on SAT and 30+ on ACT. In fact, most colleges do not require the essays — although admissions officers like to compare the quality of ACT/SAT essays to the essays written as part of the college application. They know that the students actually wrote 100% of the ACT/SAT essays, while many applicants get outside help on colleges’ essays.

At Dogwood, our expert tutors help students improve their writing skills, which they’ll demonstrate through college and beyond.

Use the following links or visit college websites to see each school’s ACT/SAT essay policy.

SAT Essay: List of colleges with their SAT Essay Policy

ACT Essay: List of colleges with their ACT Essay Policy

Why Kids Can’t Write

BEN writerWhen your daughter gets to college, will she be able to write high quality papers… or will she need remedial writing help like so many students? Will your son’s employer be impressed with or embarrassed by his correspondence with customers?

Judging by their recent ACT and SAT essays, students just don’t write well. Why are our K-12 schools turning out so many bad writers? A big reason is that teachers lack training in how to teach good writing.

The article entitled “Why Kids Can’t Write,” points out that teachers are usually very good readers after their years of college studies, but many possess weak writing skills and/or low confidence in their ability to teach writing. Those who teach only the traditional rules of grammar and punctuation usually turn out students with modest writing skills. On the other hand, when teachers are trained to combine the traditional approaches along with demonstrating more creative, free flowing writing styles, their students become more successful writers.

At Dogwood, our English language arts experts work one-on-one to help students in grades 4-12 become better writers. Using a combination of teaching methods tailored for each student’s needs, we show them how to organize their ideas into clear, effective essays, papers and correspondence. These are skills that will last a lifetime.

Read The Article>>>

Summer ACT-SAT-SSAT Prep Is A Smart Way To Start

Vector sunset or sunrise icon. Vector sunset or sunrise icon. Sunset or sunrise logo design. Vector illustration.Why not start ACT, SAT or SSAT test prep this summer when students have their lightest workload all year? At Dogwood, we work with many rising juniors and seniors to prepare for ACT in September or SAT in August (a new date this year). We also help with SSAT for private school admissions, but more about this later. The ideal situation is to complete ACT-SAT testing before the college application process intensifies in 12th grade. There are two exceptions, described below, that call for testing later in 11th grade. For most students, however, it is practical and highly productive to prepare during the summer before junior year and take a test (or both tests, if desired) the recommended two or three times.  

What are the circumstances that should tell students to wait on starting ACT-SAT testing? For one, football players should wait until their season ends because they just don’t have enough time or energy to add test prep to their already demanding schedules. All students should try to schedule around their peak seasons so they don’t add test prep to an already full plate. For students who have conflicts all year long, try to start test prep early because procrastination is not your friend.

The other exception takes into consideration students with lower math skills. The math on both ACT and SAT is primarily algebra. If rising juniors struggle with basic math and plan to take Algebra II next year, they might want to wait until second semester to start ACT-SAT test prep. For students who will take pre-calculus or advanced math in junior year, there is no reason to delay test prep because there is no calculus on either ACT or SAT.

Take One of Each Test And Then Decide What To Do – A Bad Strategy

Some people think students should take the real SAT in August and real ACT in September so they can then decide which test to prepare for. We disagree. Why pay $50 per test and wait 4+ weeks for score reports that give you absolutely no detailed information? Come to Dogwood this summer and take ACT and/or SAT practice tests at no charge. Within a few days, you’ll receive a detailed score report that gives you much better information than the real ACT or SAT score reports provide. Our comprehensive diagnostic reports help you make informed decisions about which test is a better fit for your student and how professional test prep services can help improve the results. No cost, no obligation. Just reliable information you can use.

SSAT – Secondary School Admissions Test

Most Atlanta-area independent schools require the SSAT, a very challenging test that rewards good reasoning skills along with math, reading and verbal skills. Even the most talented students in grades 5-11 need tutoring help to achieve their best SSAT results. Because most private school admissions deadlines are around February, students should start SSAT prep in the summer. You should allow time for your student to take SSAT two or three times. We do not recommend taking the SSAT without proper preparation.   

Call Dogwood Tutoring and Test Prep today at 678-735-7555 to discuss your student’s needs and goals. We look forward to helping you navigate the complex maze of admissions testing.